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Retru To The Original Page Return To The Original Page Button The Nutmeg Nux Moschata

"The Nutmeg" ~ 1737
Elizabeth Blackwell ~
A Curious Herbal ~
Volume 2 ~ Plate 353

PRINT ENTITLED: "The Nutmeg".
SOURCE: A Curious Herbal. VOLUME II.
AUTHOR/ARTIST: Elizabeth Blackwell.
PUBLISHED BY: John Nourse in London England.
DATE OF PUBLICATION: (Vol. I) 1737, (Vol. II) 1739
PLATE PAGE NUMBER: Plate 353.
SCOPE AND PURPOSE OF PUBLICATION: This publication pertains to the study of herbs as a botanical reference book on medicinal uses of plantsĀ for physicians and apothecaries.
PRINT METHOD: Copperplate engraving; see the plate mark.
PAPER TYPE: Handmade antique laid and chain.
COLORING: Hand Coloring as described in text.

"Nux Moschata" ~ 1760
Elizabeth Blackwell ~
Herbarium Blackwellianum, Selectum ~ Vol. 2 ~ Plate 353

PRINT ENTITLED: "Nux Moschata".
SOURCE: Herbarium Blackwellianum, Selectum. VOLUME II.
AUTHOR/ARTIST: Elizabeth Blackwell.
ARTIST: N. F. Eisenberger
PUBLISHED BY: Christopher Jacob Trew in Nuremberg, Germany.
DATE OF PUBLICATION: 1760.
PLATE PAGE NUMBER: Plate 353.
SCOPE AND PURPOSE OF PUBLICATION: This publication pertains to the study of herbs as a botanical reference book on medicinal uses of plantsĀ for physicians and apothecaries.
PRINT METHOD: Copperplate engraving; see the plate mark.
PAPER TYPE: Handmade antique laid and chain.
COLORING: Hand Coloring.

Elizabeth BlackwellHISTORY: Elizabeth Blachrie (1707~1758) was born in Aberdeen, Scotland. About 1720, Elizabeth married an Alexander Blackwell who practiced medicine as a physician, but without proper training. When this was discovered, the Blackwells escaped to London, where Alexander entered into the publishing business. Again, Alexander did not have the appropriate training. Being fined for his infractions while living extravagantly, Alexander was unable to pay off his obligation, and was sentenced to debtors' prison.

As the daughter of a wealthy merchant, Elizabeth Blackwell had refined instruction in drawing and painting. Consulting with her imprisoned husband and with the masters from the Chelsea Physic Gardens in London to acquire the knowledge pertaining to herbal treatments, Elizabeth drew and then engraved the copper plates for printing of over 500 plant species. It is written that she printed and then, hand colored the engravings by herself for her A Curious Herbal. Her successful marketing of her book allowed Alexander's debts to be paid.  In Germany, the second edition was published in Latin, 20 years later as Herbarium Blackwellianum, Selectum, dated 1760. 

In 1742, Alexander left Elizabeth when he moved to Sweden, where he was later hanged in 1748. Elizabeth remained in London until her death in 1758. Today, her work is prized for its distinctive art quality.

                                                                                                                                                                                 [KLOPFER article © January 2015]